Alex Papadimoulis

Alex is a speaker and writer who is passionate about looking beyond the code to build great software. In addition to founding Inedo - the makers of BuildMaster, the popular continuous delivery platform - Alex also started The Daily WTF, a fun site dedicated to building software the wrong way.

Classic WTF: Time for a tblHoliday

by in CodeSOD on
It's a holiday in the US today, which tracking the dates on which holidays fall is always a complicated, fraught proposition. Let's dig back into the archives for a classic article which can help us celebrate this holiday. This article originally ran waaaaaay back in 2006. --Remy

For most, the New Year is great occasion: not only is it kicked off with a big bash, but it's so easy to trick yourself in feeling like you have a "clean slate", setting all sorts of great goals and resolutions, and just all-around feeling good. But for some programmers, like Dave Sussman, it's not so joyous of an occasion; each change of the year is like a mini-Y2K. These programmers are the guys who get to maintain systems with comments like ...


Submit WTF Code Directly From Visual Studio

by in Announcements on

A little more than five years ago, we published a plug-in that allowed you to submit code directly from Visual Studio to The Daily WTF. However, in the years since, that style of extension was deprecated in Visual Studio, and the SubmitToWTF API was lost in the latest site redesign.

The loss was felt by many users. Without the plug-in, submitting bad code requires first printing it out, putting it on a wooden table, taking a picture of it... then printing out the picture, scanning it, then uploading as a PDF to the Submit Your WTF form.


Classic WTF: Injection Proof'd

by in CodeSOD on
It's Thanksgiving, in the US. Be thankful you're not supporting this block of code. --Remy


“When a ‘customer’ of ours needs custom-developed software to suit their business requirements,” Kelly Adams writes, “they can either ‘buy’ the development services from the IT department, or go to an outside vendor. In the latter case, then we’re supposed to approve that the software meets corporate security guidelines.”

“Most of the time, our ‘approval’ is treated as a recommendation, and we end up having to install the application anyway. But recently, they actually listened to us and told the vendor to fix the ‘blatant SQL-injection vulnerabilities’ that we discovered. A few weeks later, when it came time for our second review, we noticed the following as their ‘fix’.”


Classic WTF: The Big Ball of Yarn

by in Feature Articles on
It's Labor Day in the US, so we're taking the day off to grill something before the weather turns horrid. While I was finding legacy articles to support the Your Code Might Be Unmaintainable… article, I noticed this classic, and knew that I wanted to re-run it again soon. - Remy

Not too long ago, I posted The Enterprise Dependency. Essentially, it was a visual depiction of a good ole' enterprise framework that was "several dozen megabytes chock full of helper classes like IEnterpriseAuthenticationProviderFactoryManagementFactory." Inspired by the diagram, commenter "LieutenantFrost" shared his own "enterprise-ness and despair" with a dependency diagram that looks somewhat like an anglerfish.

But that got me thinking: like a Representative Line, perhaps dependency diagrams can help provide some insight into the pain that large applications' maintainers face each day. And just then, Jan-Hendrik sent in such a diagram. Note that each little box represents a class, and a line is its dependency to another class.


Classic WTF: RegExp from Down Under

by in CodeSOD on
This particularly bad example of regular expressions and client side validation was originally published in 2009. I thought Australia was supposed to be upside down, not bass ackwards. - Remy

"The company I work for sells vacation packages for Australia," writes Nathan, "and for whatever reason, they're marketed under different two different brands — redacted-travel.com.au and redacted-travel.com — depending on whether you live Down Under or somewhere else in the world."

Nathan continues, "one of the requirements for the international website (redacted-travel.com) is to disallow people from within Australia and New Zealand to make bookings. But the way this is done from the front end... well, it's a real gem."


Our Next Kickstarter: Lairs Board Game

by in Announcements on

I've been a board/tabletop gamer for as long as I can remember, even before writing my first program (obviously, 10 PRINT "ALEX IS COOL" / 20 GOTO 10). After seeing how much you supported the Release! game, it turned out that a lot of you are into games, too.


Tokyo TDWTF Meetup

by in Announcements on

UPDATE: April 22 will be the day!

Tokyo readers, I'll be in your fine city this month -- and that means it's time for another Tokyo/TDWTF nomihoudai! It's always a fun time, and we've got a good group of regulars now. Here's a pic of a group of us from a past meetup:


Classic WTF: Holiday Smorgasbord

by in Coded Smorgasbord on

Your Christmas present this year is a pile of WTFs from back in 2005. A veritable holiday smorgasbord. This post wouldn't be here if it didn't exist. --Remy

It's been a while since I've done a smorgasbord post, so here goes ...



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